User:Jc3s5h/Wikidata user interface test cases

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In the following table conversions from year, month, and day, where days begin at midnight, and Julian day, which begins at noon, are performed at noon for the day in question. The convention that the year 0 exists and is equal to 1 BC is followed in this table and ought to be used in the user interface, since that is the convention followed by astronomers since 1740 and the current version of ISO 8601 (the 2004 edition).

User input Julian year Julian month Julian day of month Julian day Comment
-0-02-29 1 BC 2 29 1721117 Preview says it will be displayed as 29 February 0 BCE which is inherently wrong
0-02-29 1 BC 2 29 1721117 Preview says it will be displayed as 29 February 0 which is correct value but inconsistent with normal date display. Timestamp in diff is +0000-02-29T00:00:00Z. In RDF the date is present but not in same form as other dates.
29 February 0 1 BC 2 29 1721117 Preview says it will be displayed as 29 February 0 which is correct value but inconsistent with normal date display. Timestamp in diff is +0000-02-29T00:00:00Z. In RDF the date is present but not in same form as other dates.
-0001-02-29 undefined undefined undefined undefined Preview says it will be displayed as 29 February 1 BCE, which only makes sense if the year 0 does not exist. But astronomical year numbering and most non-obsolete computer-oriented standards say year 0 does exist.
29 February 1 BC 1 BC 2 29 1721117 Preview says it will be displayed as 1 March 1 BCE which is wrong. The year 1 BC is a leap year in both Julian and Gregorian calendars.
29 February 101 BC 101 BC 29 29 1684592 Preview says it will be displayed as 1 March 101 BCE which is wrong. The year 101 BC is a leap year in Julian and common year in Gregorian calendars.
29 February 401 BC 401 BC 2 29 1575017 Preview says it will be displayed as 1 March 401 BCE which is wrong. The year 401 BC is a leap year in both Julian and Gregorian calendars.
29 February 1600 1600 2 29 2305517 Preview says it will be displayed as 29 February 1600 Julian which is correct; leap year in both calendars.
29 February 1700 1700 2 29 2342042 Preview says it will be displayed as 1 March 1700 Julian which is wrong; leap year in Julian but common year in Gregorian calendars.

References[edit]

Julian Date Converter. (2015 December 8). United States Naval Observatory. Beware, "This application assumes that the changeover from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar occurred in October of 1582, according to the scheme instituted by Pope Gregory XIII. Specifically, for dates on or before 4 October 1582, the Julian calendar is used; for dates on or after 15 October 1582, the Gregorian calendar is used."

John Walker. (2015 September). Calendar converter. Beware of idiosyncratic convention that year 0 exists in Gregorian calendar but does not exist in Julian calendar.