Talk:Sparrow (usability testing)

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DannyH (WMF) (talkcontribs)

Can someone add more information about sparrow migration patterns? There is no information on this at all on the page.

Reply to "Sparrow migrating patterns"
Dchen (WMF) (talkcontribs)

Right now, the article says that red sparrows only live in North America. Is that true? I thought that there were red sparrow colonies in Central America too. What's the source for the claim about North American red sparrows?

DRtester1 (talkcontribs)

"The Big Book of Where Sparrows Are" by Simone Feathers p. 34 "Red Sparrows have been seen as far South as Brazil."

This post was hidden by Dchen (WMF) (history)
DRtester1 (talkcontribs)

"The Big Book of Where Sparrows Are" by Simone Feathers p. 34 "Red Sparrows have been seen as far South as Brazil."

Reply to "Red sparrow territory"
DRtester1 (talkcontribs)

Please clarify your source...

Reply to "Header"
DRtester1 (talkcontribs)

Please clarify...

Reply to "Header"
Dchen (WMF) (talkcontribs)

Moved the Sparrows in Literature section back here from House Sparrow, since it concerns sparrows generically, and this is where you would naturally think to find it. Oliverkroll 21:28, 4 October 2006 (UTC)

DRtester1 (talkcontribs)

Hello

Reply to "Literature"
BanjoDog (talkcontribs)

There are some newer studies that suggest that feather color in birds evolved over time to match the plant species that they were living amongst. This study also talks about how birds view colors and it links the visual aspect of birds and how they visually adsorb color.

I found an interesting study where they found that plumage was also associated with nest height and geographical area.

Something that could be added to the plumage section is that some studies have shown that barred pattern in feathers is more common in females than males and is mostly used for camouflage, while mottled feathers were found to be most used in signaling.

DannyH (WMF) (talkcontribs)

I'm agree with your caution due to the fact the probably you can't find an on-line version of the above mentioned paper. Besides I'm sure it is not a problem concerning a german reference... I've got one copy sent me directly by the author, that I used for my Ph.D. thesis. You can find evidence of this theory in a more recent paper http://icb.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/4/478.full published by Oxford University Press.

Reply to "Feather color"
DannyH (WMF) (talkcontribs)

Moved the Sparrows in Literature section back here from House Sparrow, since it concerns sparrows generically, and this is where you would naturally think to find it.

BanjoDog (talkcontribs)

The ITIS is using a rather old taxonomy (it isn't updated much, and I remember being strange in some areas), and I think the IUCN is the same; Zoonomen just displays the taxonomies of the "Peters Checklist, H&M 3rd ed., and CBBM" and the IOC is very fast to adopt proposed changes. The HBW (2009) places the genera in Ploceidae, and discusses the taxonomic issues. That doesn't make a "consensus" of sources, I think, so I'm not sure we should adopt this in taxoboxes. At any rate the article should discuss the genera in question in general, which is what I'll add if it's not clearer.

Reply to "Literature about Sparrows"
BanjoDog (talkcontribs)

The article should answer the question: Are sparrows the most common bird worldwide?

It depends upon the definition of "most common". I wouldn't treat a bird that is common to only one part of one continent as the "most common" in the world. I would consider "most common" to be a function of both range and population -- something like "most commonly seen in most parts of the world" The Red-billed Quelea may be the most abundant bird species, but is it actually more abundant than the total population of all the species of Old World sparrow?

Reply to "Most common?"

What scent is Sparrows most attracted to?

1
DRtester1 (talkcontribs)

Birds have strong noses.

Reply to "What scent is Sparrows most attracted to?"

Source for putting Plocepasser and others in Passeridae

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BanjoDog (talkcontribs)

I'd like to update the sparrow article properly, so I'd like to know your source for putting Plocepasser in Passeridae. The one you gave in a hidden note is about the lice of Malagasy warblers, and does not discuss sparrows or weavers.

DannyH (WMF) (talkcontribs)

The following place the genera in question in the Passeridae: IOC, IUCN, Zoonomen, and ITIS. I see Clements has it in Ploceidae. I went with consensus, since we don't have a single standard.....

Reply to "Source for putting Plocepasser and others in Passeridae"